How to Reduce Your Weight in a Week

Here’s how to reduce your weight in a week… or possibly less. I’m going to share with you a few less popular secets… things you may have heard about but really didn’t understand how they relate to weight loss. If you’re interested in perhaps learning something new about reducing fat, then read this now.

How to Reduce your Weight in a Week

1. Consider using Extra Virgin Coconut Oil

This is definitely not your typical weight loss product. It isn’t even categoried as a weight loss product. BUT IT IS. In fact, if I was forced to choose any weight loss “supplement” to take for 2 weeks in order to lose a lot of weight fast, I’d be taking this stuff.

Natural coconut oil is a healthy fat. It’s good for you… so don’t freak out about it being a fat. Don’t worry about that. The bad fats come from things in packages… manmade things. Coconuts are from nature.

Anyway, you’ll want the coconut oil that has “extra virgin” or “cold pressed” on the label… this is for purity and processing reasons. Once you get it, you simply need to take 1 tablespoon twice a day between meals on an empty stomach.

It’s common for women… and men, to lose 5 or more pounds in less than 2 weeks. The cost is about $12… so it’s not a big risk for you to take.

2. Organic apple cider vinegar

This thing is NASTY. But, people who are serious about losing weight will overlook that. I do. I love the stuff because it helps me to maintain my weight and lose weight whenever I need to drop a couple pounds, but I also hate it because it just tastes awful. A way around this is to just douse it on a salad or your foods this way it blends in and you won’t taste it as much. I however take it straight. I take a gulp of it before meals to help break down the fats and carbs in those foods.

It OBLITERATES them. When using organic apple cider vinegar, your food gets digested much faster and more efficient. This obviously helps with weight loss.

I recommend taking about a tablespoon before 2 meals… everyday.

These are 2 very good tips on how to reduce your weight in a week… so USE THEM.

Oh to Own a Designer Dress!

How many women can honestly say, without crossing fingers behind backs, that they have not gone weak-kneed at the sight of that oh so alluring designer dress, which sparkles so suggestively in the shop window? It can be safely assumed, judging by the popularity of such dresses, that those who answer 'no' are in the minority.

Seemingly innocent at first glance, the power a beautifully designed garment can hold over a person, is astonishing. Just go to any designer shop and you will hear the agonised mutterings of 'Oh, I really should not … No, I'm not going to buy it … Well, there's no harm in just trying it on .. Oh God, I love it … No, I can not buy it … Ok, just this once … '

The heart usually prevails and the person in question returns home with the contented feeling they have just bought something special; something that not everyone else has. This is the lure of the designer.

Although clothing's fundamental purpose is to protect the body from nature's elements, its role has radically altered over time. Historians believe the first clothes consist of materials like fur, leather and leaves, which were wrapped around a person's body, thus sheltering them from the weather. In today's society however, clothes are viewed more as a statement about an individual, rather than being necessary for their survival.

Advances in technology, such as central heating, helped to bring about this change, but it is understood that Charles Frederick Worth, born in England in 1825, shaped the world of clothing, and in particular, women's dressmaking; thus giving birth to the term 'fashion' in the way we understand it today.

After moving to France to work for Parisian drappers, Gagelin and Opigez, Mr Worth married one of their models, where he began making dresses for her. Soon after, customers began asking for replicas of the dresses, which prompted him to seek financial backing for his own dressmaking business.

In time, he became named for his designs, which were much simpler and said to be more flattering for the lady's figure than others of the time; he has become popular with an array of rich, distinguished women, including royalty and the famous. He also moved away from letting women design garments themselves, and instead chose to display his own designs at fashion shows, which were held four times a year.

So the rise of the designer dress began, and other fashion designers followed suit to create whole collections of designer clothes.

Fashion designers are now commonplace, designing clothing for individual clients, specialty stores and / or high-fashion department stores. What distinguishes their clothing from the norm is the originality of design, coupled with the limited availability of garment numbers.

This, essentially, is what makes designer clothing so bought after and is why those skilfully crafted designer dresses can make one go weak-kneed in praise – not only at the thought of possessing one, but also in the knowledge that they own something unique.

Differences Between Damask, Brocade, and Jacquard

Often times, uneducated individuals use the terms damask, brocade, and Jacquard interchangeably with one another. It can often confuse those who are unfamiliar with the world of fabrics. Jacquard is a decorative or woven pattern that is created by using a Jacquard attachment on a loom. The attachment resembles the punch card on a piano. It is purported to offer better versatility and fabric control for the operator of the loom. The Jacquard technique can be applied to a variety of fabrics, and it is commonly used on brocade and damask fabrics. It is commonly used in a variety of apparel and home goods, from tablecloths to bedding.

Brocade is defined as a lavishly decorated, shuttle woven fabric. It is primarily woven from silk; although, it is possible to find brocade constructed from a blend of silk and synthetic fibers. Often, it will be embroidered with gold or silver thread. Brocade can trace its origins back to India, where weaving is a traditional art form. It is typically woven on a loom, and it may or may not be woven using the Jacquard technique. It is also characterized by the manner in which the brocaded or broached parts of the fabric hang in loose groups or are clipped away. Although the scenes and patterns on brocade appear to have been embroidered, the scenes are actually woven into the fabric using advanced weaving techniques that involve manipulating the weft and weave of the fabric. The most common types of scenes depicted on brocade fabric are those of floral prints.

Damask, similarly to brocade, is a fabric that features woven scenes of floral patterns, intricate geometric designs, or simple scenes of domestic life. It may be woven of silk, wool, linen, cotton, or synthetic fibers. However, it is most commonly created from silk. It is primarily different from brocade in the fact that its woven fabric pattern is reversible, while that of brocade is not. Similarly, shorter weft patterns in damask allow for more subtle effects in the fabric to be created as it plays off of shadow and light. Damask weaves also contain a higher thread count than that of brocade. Double damask weaves are the highest quality of damask produced; however, it is also the most expensive.

5 Reasons Women Love Romance Movies

Since the beginning of cinema, romance movies have been well loved – predominately by women. Today, when a new romantic comedy or drama hits theaters, it's the perfect excuse for a ladies' night gathering. Many men (and even a few women) have amazed what it is about this genre of film that draws women in. Here are 5 reasons women love romance movies.

Women Love Getting In Touch With Their Emotions

Women are emotional beings, and not only do they have no issue displaying their emotions but many do not mind having those emotions drawn out of them. Sometimes it just feels good to have a hearty laugh or let the tears flow while watching others go through the ebb and flow of finding love, falling in love and losing love.

Women Prefer to Watch Rather Than Read Romance

Okay, so this is not true for all women (but what statement is?). However, with the busyness that consumes the daily lives of most women, many prefer watching romance movies to reading romance novels. It's less time consuming, equally entertaining -or more so for some- and equally emotion spurring.

Women Love Using Romance Movies to Hint At Men

Women love watching romance movies to throw hints at the men in their lives as to what he should or should not be doing in their relationship. Some women will watch the movies alone while making notes or with their guy and having him take notes. Yes, a woman wants a man to chase her when she storms out after a fight, to serenade her from below her bedroom window and of course, to whisper sweet cinematic lines in her ear that give Tom Cruise's classic "You complete me" some serious competition.

Women Relate to the Characters or Plot

Some romance movies are just plain happy -and women may love those too- but some women love the more realistic films, the ones they can painfully refer to. Typically, stories of lost love and young love spark emotions in women and bring up old memories but women can appreciate the way the film made them feel and even relish in the memories.

Women Want to Be the Characters and Live the Plot

So, what's the number one reason most women love romance movies? The Fantasy, of course! The happy ending is what every woman wants and few get to live in real life. It's a nice escape from the reality of real life relationships for 90 minutes!